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Husky Airways

Småland Perfectly Formed 8: Friday 21st September

I had two ambitions for this trip. One was to photograph my bike with a Swedish plane, which I achieved at Kalmar Airport, and the other was to get a sticker with the famous elk warning sign to go on my top box. I'd had no luck with the latter despite trying every petrol station and tourist information centre we came across. On our last morning in Sweden, we serendipitously stopped for petrol right next to Laganland Elk Park and its Elk Shop, full of every tacky elk-themed souvenir item anyone could ever need.

On our return journey we skipped the Öresund Bridge in favour of the ferry which runs, confusingly, from Helsingborg in Sweden to Helsingør in Denmark. This was the kind of short crossing where bikes aren't strapped down and you can, if you wish, stay with your vehicle on the car deck, although we chose to stretch our legs.

Due to regulations, during the 20-minute journey you can buy tobacco in Swedish waters and alcohol in Danish territory. We pooled our last kronor for a bottle of whisky and a cuddly wolf, since named Ingrid Bergwolf.

We hammered through the Danish flatlands, lashed by wind and rain and swerving on the motorway to avoid two pallets blown from a lorry ahead of us. We crossed a high bridge followed by a long section of road with the sea on either side, which I found less pleasant than I usually do.

We still made good enough time to leave the motorways for country roads towards the end of the day. These were pretty but dreadfully exposed, with sudden sidewinds that threatened to knock us into the path of oncoming traffic.

Flensburg in Schleswig-Holstein, near the Danish border, is famous for homing the German equivalent of the DVLA, which we gave a miss, and the greeting "Moin" for "hello", which I was overjoyed to hear at a petrol station the next morning. There's a church with a spire, a big C&A, and a waterfront with proper bierkeller-style pubs.

We ate at Hansens Brauerei, "Germany's northernmost microbrewery", where the pork joint 'for two' could have fed a family of six. We somehow finished all the roast potatoes, though.

Miles: 319

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Comments

Yikes, you didn't tell me all that scary stuff!

I can't read 'Schleswig-Holstein' without mentally following it with 'Question' and thinking of Palmerston; such is the power of O-Level history.
All the way through Sweden I was thinking 'wow, this is the least scary motorcycling holiday I've ever had'. Too good to last?

I'm like that with Stettin (in the Baltic and Trieste in the Adriatic...)
Schloos-weg Hool-steen, aka home away from home for me. Never been there, but that's where the family is from.

Lemme know if you ever go thru Meldorf.

Technically, it's "moin moin" if you're feeling especially chatty. Heh.

Oh, and Kaffe with cardamom and egg nog is a MUST have. With whipped cream.

I enjoy reading your travel blogs and am kicking myself for forgetting your birthday!!
I have noted all these points, especially the coffee one! And I had a quiet birthday this year after the big 4-0 last year.
We pooled our last kronor for a bottle of whisky and a cuddly wolf, since named Ingrid Bergwolf.

Excellent choices. :D

Flensburg in Schleswig-Holstein, near the Danish border, is famous for homing the German equivalent of the DVLA, which we gave a miss, and the greeting "Moin" for "hello", which I was overjoyed to hear at a petrol station the next morning.

You'll hear that all over the state of Schleswig-Holstein actually — and beyond, I think it's common in Hamburg as well, though I don't know about the southern 14.
Ah, thanks - I'll listen out! I do want to visit Hamburg some time, as it's a Bond movie location (Tomorrow Never Dies).
Hamburg is worth a visit — it's not Berlin, obviously, but it's got its own maritime charm.

Re: "Moin" vs. "Moin Moin", BTW (since it was brought up in another comment), you can say both, but on the west coast in particular, the former's more common; folks living there have a reputation for tight-lippedness, and there's a saying there that "he who says 'Moin Moin' likes to hear himself talking".
Ah, thank you! Wikipedia said 'Moin Moin' but the only example I heard was just 'Moin'. (I also saw it come up on a cash register, which was cute.)
Aww yeah, that's cute indeed. ^^
Sounds like a bit of a scary ride! Dodging pallets from a truck and on a windy day! DX
A good reason to stay off motorways if you can!