?

Log in

No account? Create an account
The Spy Who Loved Me

Überlin 3: Saturday 25/11

Today Arakin and I were going to the DDR Museum, the museum of everyday life in the former East Germany. We dashed through the rain to the tram stop then queued in the rain for the museum, which turned out to be well worth it.

If, like me, you are interested in both the Cold War and foreign and/or retro consumer goods, this is paradise. Jars of pickles! Plastic egg cups shaped like chickens! Really awful toilet paper!

Much of this will be familiar to fans of Goodbye, Lenin, who will also enjoy watching one of the Sandman stop-motion shorts designed to get children in the right frame of mind for bed.

One section of the museum is a mockup of a flat, so you wander from child's bedroom to kitchen to bathroom, examining the books, cleaning products and shower hoses so specific to this place and time. There's even a Trabant with a built-in driving simulator, so you can experience the thrill of piloting an underpowered car made from PVC around a housing estate.

It's lighthearted, but they don't shy away from telling you the more serious stuff: the rigged elections, the hushed-up pollution, the compulsory military service. (I turned out to be very good at a game where you match East German military slang terms to their meanings. This is because I have a filthy, filthy mind.)

By the time we emerged, it was mid-afternoon and lunch was long overdue. Nurnberger sausages at the Augustiner came just in time to stop me killing anyone.

It was getting dark, and it was still raining, but there was something particular I wanted to do in Berlin and now seemed like a good time.

I was going to the café where James Bond stops for an espresso in the short story The Living Daylights before deciding whether to go for a stroll in the park or visit a brothel.

[Spoiler (click to open)](He chooses the former.)

The internet had told me that Café Marquardt was attached to the Kempinski Hotel and was now called Café Reinhard. We went in rather timidly, because it Looked Posh, but were welcomed and seated in the window.

It was warm and cosy next to the heater, and candles in silver holders burned on the tables. There were even newspapers on a wooden rack, just like in the story.

I had an espresso (Arakin kindly offered me some of his latte too, so I wouldn't have to suffer too much for my art) and a ridiculous slab of raspberry cake Bond would have rejected out of hand but I enjoyed very much.

Coming in from the cold and rainy afternoon, the delicious cake and the feeling of being in a special place whose other customers were probably entirely unaware it was special made for one of the best memories of my trip.

Back at the flat, we asked Amazon for a spy movie and it suggested The Spy Who Came: 48 minutes of sexploitation from 1969 that proved more baffling than shocking. Not recommended.

Here's a song I discovered at the DDR Museum. Enjoy!



38639225276_20cdc9b645_k

38639242296_c55258e180_k

38663059482_a9a7c8144b_k

cake

Comments

Hopefully no one thinks that DDR just stands for Dance Dance Revolution.
Obviously we made jokes about that, because furry!
By the time we emerged, it was mid-afternoon and lunch was long overdue. Nurnberger sausages at the Augustiner came just in time to stop me killing anyone.

I'm starting to sense a theme... you really like Bavarian food, don't you? (Can't blame you — so do I!)

I had an espresso (Arakin kindly offered me some of his latte too, so I wouldn't have to suffer too much for my art) and a ridiculous slab of raspberry cake Bond would have rejected out of hand but I enjoyed very much.

The cake looks very nice. Why would Bond not have eaten it?
He doesn't seem to have much of a sweet tooth - his loss!

I dooooo like Bavarian food! Sausage and potato are two of my favourite things ^.^
Ah, I see. Yup, his loss indeed!

Bavaria also has lots of great dumplings. Semmelknödel are probably the most famous, but there's also e.g. Leberknödel (liver dumplings) — those are great, and they're also used for a soup, creatively called Leberknödelsuppe. And speaking of soups there's a soup with pancake strips in it (Frittatensuppe), which is pretty awesome, especially when you're a kid.

I also like the meats they do, and the sauces. ^^
Ooh. I do like a dumping.

I'm also a big fan of Spätzle. All the carbs plz.
Ooh yes, Spätzle are lovely! And Maultaschen — more of a Swabian than a Bavarian thing, I think, but that's still close enough. If you ever find yourself in a restaurant that offers homemade ones, go for them, they're great. (And be sure to get the innkeeper to explain why they're also called "Herrgottsb'scheißerle"... ^^)
Ooh, inside information! Noted - thank you!
I will make my way to Oktoberfest one day.
Better or worse toilet paper, I wonder, than that which I knew for a out the first six years or so of my life.. ^_^; (Dad got A Deal™ on some ungodly volume of stuff from a bankruptcy auction. Suffice to say, I also sometimes used it as tracing paper)

For some reason, I really dig the matchbox design. ^_^

Given my background, I was further split as to whether the museum’s name referred to the former state, the game, or type of DRAM. =:)

I admit, I don’t tend to be much of a cakemuncher, but when the urge strikes, there’s nothing better than a good carrot cake, cliched as that may sound. =:) Pecan pie, too, but that’s into hen’s teeth territory in Europe. *sigh* That said, cake is akin to pizza - it’s all good. Even if pineapple is somehow occasionally forcibly involved with the latter. =:)
NO! NO PINEAPPLE ON PIZZA! EVER! >:(
> NO! NO PINEAPPLE ON PIZZA! EVER! >:(

*blocked and unfriended*

I remember the tracing paper type stuff; we suffered it at my primary school, which had awful, awful loos.

I do like cake and I am fairly indiscriminate, but lemon drizzle to my mum's recipe probably tops the charts.
Pineapple on pizza is quite nice, though. As is banana, for that matter!
I had banana on pizza once, in Holland, and I did think that was going A Bit Far. I was younger and less adventurous then, though, so I should try it again some time!
It was a fad here for a while — it's died down a bit, but I still like it when it's combined with cooked ham and curry (powder).

I think one of the most adventurous pizza toppings I've had so far was fried eggs and bacon, but while I generally like egg on pizza, I wouldn't necessarily recommend that one.
I had Ham, Banana and curry powder pizza in Stockholm, it was lovely :)

I did think pasta on a pizza was a bit odd when I was in New York though. It wasn't bad, just... odd.
Oh yeah, that's something I never got either! You can buy frozen pizza with pasta as a topping in supermarkets here; I tried it once, but didn't find it appealing. It was like you said — not strictly bad, just odd.
I bought a macaroni cheese pizza recently and it was horrible, to my enormous disappointment. I like the sound of banana and curry powder, though!

For a while, there was a West Indian pub near me that did a shrimp jambalaya pizza, jerk chicken pizza and even saltfish and ackee pizza. I had the shrimp one and it was amazing. Miss that place
Mmm, those do sound very nice. I occasionally get a "mista di mare" pizza that has fish, shrimp and clam meat on it, and that's quite nice, though I'm sure it can't compete with a real, home-made (pub-made) one.