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Hope's Huskies - Bunty cover

Onwards to Victory

Last night I went to a talk in Dulwich by specialist children's literary agent Julia Churchill. We learned what an agent does, what they look for in a query and in a submission, what happens after you're taken on, and why you can be rejected by 49 agents only to be welcomed with open arms by the 50th.

Julia is among the many agents to have rejected me with naught but a form letter; learning that most of an agent's day is spent looking after existing clients, while slush pile reading is done in the evenings and at weekends, made me feel slightly better about that.

And when, inamongst all these talks and courses, do I actually find time to knuckle down and write stuff? Good question.
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OK, I had to read that twice to realize we weren't talking about that sort of agent — just the literary variety. :)

Being rejected is never nice, of course, especially with a form letter, but she's right: the 49 who reject you don't matter, only the one that welcomes you does.
Literary agents, secret agents, I'd love either to take an interest in me!
Perhaps you could combine the two and get a secret literary agent?
There's a rather good Kindle Single, Bentinck's Agent, about the literary agent of a secret agent...
I suppose it's not that dissimilar to applying for a regular job - there'll be plenty of rejections (and outright ignorals), before happening upon the employer which really clicks, both in project and style. All a matter of perseverance, ne?

And I suppose that kind of work balance for them makes sense - no sense in taking on more clients than you can handle, however meritorious the newcomers may be, balanced against an interest in trying to nurture new talents.

And yes, I know the feeling of trying to find the right time to get down to attending to my photography.. someday, I'll actually get the photography store open. Someday. =:/
Applying for a job!! Yes, I like that - I'll think of it that way from now on :)

And yes, open the shop!