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Don Quixote

Writing for Children, Week 2

Well, the three-headed dog went down OK. We split into two groups to look at each other's work and there was much admiration and laughter. The others in my group had produced a modern retelling of The Three Little Pigs, a tale about a boy who's afraid to cry because another child has told him that when you cry the crybaby birds come and peck your eyes out, and a story in verse about losing your Mum in the supermarket.

As well as students talking about their children or the ones they teach or counsel, there's a lot of reminiscing about our own childhoods and the things that concerned or upset us, which is fun.

It turns out I'd got ahead of the game with my three-headed dog book, because Greek mythology is one of the subjects studied in Year 4, our target audience for next week. (This sort of information is very useful to me as I know nothing of Years and Key Stages.)

We looked at a retelling of the Theseus story and at an extract from Jacqueline Wilson's Bad Girls, sparking heated debate between the pro- and anti-Wilson lobbies. Our homework for this week is to write something suitable for nine-year-olds, either about Issues or about myths.

I think this calls for Greek myths in the style of Jacqueline Wilson, about how hard it is to fit in with your peer group when your dad is also your brother. Do I dare?
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I think this calls for Greek myths in the style of Jacqueline Wilson, about how hard it is to fit in with your peer group when your dad is also your brother. Do I dare?

Damn right you do!
<<THIS
Haha, I'll see what I can do!
Or...

this
Oedipus / duck-billed platypus: best rhyme ever.
Jacqueline Wilson has done implied brother/sister incest (in Midnight), so I say raise the stakes!
Gosh, I suppose she has (that is the kind of implication that always sails over my head). Right then!